First Amendment Protects Offensive Food Truck Logo

A food truck called “The Wandering Dago” wanted to sell some food at a public plaza in Albany, New York.  However, New York’s Office of General Services denied the food truck’s application to set up shop.  (A “dago” is slur, used disparagingly toward those of Italian descent, and sometimes Spanish and Portuguese.)  The food truck… Read More First Amendment Protects Offensive Food Truck Logo

Court Upholds Federal Limit on Per-Election Campaign Contributions

Laura Holmes and Paul Jost—a married couple who appear to have done political fundraising in the past—challenged a federal law’s per-election ceilings on First Amendment grounds.  That law limits the amount that an individual can contribute to a candidate for a federal office (such as a presidential candidate).  The per-individual limit is $2600.  That same federal… Read More Court Upholds Federal Limit on Per-Election Campaign Contributions

40-Foot Cross on Public Property in Maryland Violates First Amendment

Shortly after World War I, private organizations in Prince George’s County, Maryland began building a large cross affixed with plaques and inscriptions to commemorate veterans of that county who died in the war.  The cross, which stands four stories tall, was located in the median of a highway intersection.  In 1961, citing the fact that… Read More 40-Foot Cross on Public Property in Maryland Violates First Amendment

Unconstitutional for Washington to Require Political Parties to Elect Legislative District Chairs

In King County, Washington, the Republican Central Committee had a longstanding practice of appointing (rather than electing) its chairs in each legislative district. Andrew Pilloud, a former Republican candidate for state representative in Seattle, challenged the constitutionality of that practicing.  He argued that state law requires the district chairs for political parties to be elected, not… Read More Unconstitutional for Washington to Require Political Parties to Elect Legislative District Chairs

Feds May Obtain Anonymous Website Reviewer Personal Info

Glassdoor.com is a website operating with the goal of ensuring transparency between employers and employees.  There, employees of various companies can anonymously share information about their employer including interviewing practices, salaries, and the overall employer environment. Before posting any employer reviews, employees are asked for their email address and told that their information will be… Read More Feds May Obtain Anonymous Website Reviewer Personal Info

Federal Government Cannot Prohibit “FUCT” Trademark

You may remember the Supreme Court case from last summer in which the high court unanimously agreed that the Federal Government could not prohibit an all-Asian-American band from trademarking its band name, “The Slants.”  The Court struck down as unconstitutional the law that prohibits “disparaging” trademarks.  We noted earlier that the same federal law also prohibits “scandalous”… Read More Federal Government Cannot Prohibit “FUCT” Trademark

Michigan Anti-Vaxxer Told that Her Catholic Faith Does Not Oppose Vaccination

Much has been written about parents that refuse to vaccinate their children.  But as far as we know, this is the first time that the First Amendment has come up. Michigan requires that children be vaccinated.  But like almost every other state, Michigan provides waivers from the vaccination requirement if parents have religious objections.  A… Read More Michigan Anti-Vaxxer Told that Her Catholic Faith Does Not Oppose Vaccination