Kansas Woman Ordered by Police to Stop Praying Will Get Her Day in Court

Last June, we wrote about a Kansas woman, Mary Anne Sause, who had police come to her house to investigate a noise complaint.  During the officers’ investigation, she knelt down to pray, at which point the officers ordered her to stop praying and stand up.  She sued them, arguing that the officers violated her First Amendment… Read More Kansas Woman Ordered by Police to Stop Praying Will Get Her Day in Court

Gag Order in Georgia Murder Trial Stuck Down

In February 2017, Ryan Duke was arrested and charged with the murder of Tara Grinstead, who went missing almost 12 years earlier.  Tara was a south Georgia high school teacher and beauty queen, and her disappearance and Duke’s subsequent trial attracted substantial media attention.  (Indeed, her murder has its own Wikipedia page.) Five days after… Read More Gag Order in Georgia Murder Trial Stuck Down

Prisons Allowed to Permanently Deny Inmates Visits with Family

In 1998, Clarence Easterling, a Wisconsin man, was put on probation after being convicted of sexually assaulting a minor female.  Then, three years later, his daughter was born shortly before he was sentenced to 25 years for armed robbery.  Easterling has tried both in 2004 and 2013 to get his daughter to visit him, but… Read More Prisons Allowed to Permanently Deny Inmates Visits with Family

No First Amendment Right of Public Access to Court Documents in Death Penalty Cases

In general, the public has a First Amendment right to access court documents in both civil and criminal cases. Larry Flynt lives in Missouri and tried to access confidential (or “sealed”) court records in a death-penalty case.  Specifically, he wanted access to documents about Missouri’s death-penalty protocol and medical members of its execution team, questioning… Read More No First Amendment Right of Public Access to Court Documents in Death Penalty Cases

Unconstitutional for Police to Detain California Man for Being “Argumentative”

Law-enforcement officers showed up at the house of Merritt Sharp, looking for his son, for whom the officers had an arrest warrant.  They mistook Sharp for his son, arrested Sharp, and put him in the back of their squad car.  Sharp was livid, “loudly swearing” and “threatening to sue them.” A few minutes later, the… Read More Unconstitutional for Police to Detain California Man for Being “Argumentative”

Feds May Obtain Anonymous Website Reviewer Personal Info

Glassdoor.com is a website operating with the goal of ensuring transparency between employers and employees.  There, employees of various companies can anonymously share information about their employer including interviewing practices, salaries, and the overall employer environment. Before posting any employer reviews, employees are asked for their email address and told that their information will be… Read More Feds May Obtain Anonymous Website Reviewer Personal Info