Okay for Church Retirement Plans to Be Exempt from Federal Regulatory Law

Like other religiously affiliated non-profits, Catholic Health Initiatives (a Colorado-based health care provider) offers its employees a retirement plan which is exempt from the requirements of the federal law known as ERISA (which stands for Early Retirement Income Security Act). ERISA sets minimum standards for private-sector pension plans and information for plans’ beneficiaries.  Janeen Medina,… Read More Okay for Church Retirement Plans to Be Exempt from Federal Regulatory Law

California Permitting Scheme for Commercial Weddings Held Unconstitutional

Michael Fowler and his company Epona, LLC (of which he is the sole member) own  a 40-acre piece of land located in Ventura County, in southwest California.  Though the land is zoned for agricultural use, Fowler built a garden on the property he wanted to use to host weddings and related events. A county ordinance… Read More California Permitting Scheme for Commercial Weddings Held Unconstitutional

Court Upholds Montana Ban on Judicial Candidates’ from Seeking Political Endorsements

This is the second case in as many months dealing with Montana’s campaign-finance laws. In Montana, judges are picked by popular election.  Judicial candidates can’t seek or use partisan political endorsements in their campaigns.  In 2014, Sanders County judicial candidate Mark French received the endorsement of the Sanders County Republican Committee as well as endorsements… Read More Court Upholds Montana Ban on Judicial Candidates’ from Seeking Political Endorsements

Nevada School-Uniform Policy Held Unconstitutional

The Fruddens, who live in Reno, Nevada, sent their children to Roy Gomm Elementary School for grades K-6.  Before the 2011-2012 school year, the school enacted a new uniform policy which required students to wear red or navy-blue polo t-shirts or sweatshirts, as well as khaki-colored “bottoms” such as pants, capris, shorts, or skirts.  The… Read More Nevada School-Uniform Policy Held Unconstitutional

40-Foot Cross on Public Property in Maryland Violates First Amendment

Shortly after World War I, private organizations in Prince George’s County, Maryland began building a large cross affixed with plaques and inscriptions to commemorate veterans of that county who died in the war.  The cross, which stands four stories tall, was located in the median of a highway intersection.  In 1961, citing the fact that… Read More 40-Foot Cross on Public Property in Maryland Violates First Amendment

Feds May Obtain Anonymous Website Reviewer Personal Info

Glassdoor.com is a website operating with the goal of ensuring transparency between employers and employees.  There, employees of various companies can anonymously share information about their employer including interviewing practices, salaries, and the overall employer environment. Before posting any employer reviews, employees are asked for their email address and told that their information will be… Read More Feds May Obtain Anonymous Website Reviewer Personal Info

Montana’s Campaign Contribution Limits Upheld

This is another post-Citizens United challenge to campaign-finance laws. In 1994, voters in Montana passed a state initiative known simply as “Initiative 118,” which altered limits on campaign contributions in state elections.  These changes included reducing the amount of money individuals and PACs could contribute to candidates (direct contributions) and increasing the amount of money… Read More Montana’s Campaign Contribution Limits Upheld