California’s Credit-Card Surcharge Law Held Unconstitutional

Credit-card companies charge retailers a small percentage of every transaction paid for with a credit card.  Understandably, retailers can before frustrated by these charges and want to pass on the charges to consumers who choose to pay with credit cards. California—concerned that some consumers might be deceived by retailers who don’t clearly notify consumers of… Read More California’s Credit-Card Surcharge Law Held Unconstitutional

San Francisco’s Notice Requirement for Landlords Upheld

Landlords sometimes try to “buy out” their tenants—give them money in exchange for vacating the unit.  (This is also sometimes called a “no-fault eviction” because the landlord is trying to remove the tenant through no fault of the tenant.  And we’re guessing that landlords try to buyout tenants when it’s in the landlord’s financial interest… Read More San Francisco’s Notice Requirement for Landlords Upheld

First Amendment No Obstacle to Federal Uranium-Mining Ban in Arizona

In 2012, the Interior Department imposed a 20-year ban on new uranium mining on over a million acres of federal land in Arizona near the Grand Canyon.  One of the reasons for the ban was concern over groundwater contamination.  But another reason cited was to preserve “cultural and tribal resources” on the land because the… Read More First Amendment No Obstacle to Federal Uranium-Mining Ban in Arizona

First Amendment Affirms Right to Protest at St. Patty’s Day Parade––Even When Vice President Pence Attends

Vice President Pence announced that he would attend the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Savannah, Georgia.  Accordingly, city officials––in collaboration with the Secret Service–– released a list of 29 items that would be prohibited at the parade.  Among those items were posters and signs that would presumably be used to protest against the Vice President. … Read More First Amendment Affirms Right to Protest at St. Patty’s Day Parade––Even When Vice President Pence Attends

Travel-Ban Protesters at Denver Airport Lose First Amendment Challenge

Early last year, protesters gathered at the Denver airport to express their opposition to President Trump’s executive order temporarily restricting people from several majority-Muslim countries from entering the United States—the so-called “travel ban.” At the time (and still today), a Denver ordinance requires anyone protesting at the Denver airport to first obtain a permit.  The… Read More Travel-Ban Protesters at Denver Airport Lose First Amendment Challenge

Court Upholds University of Alabama’s Permitting Scheme for On-Campus Speech

Rodney Keister is a traveling Christian evangelical.  He proselytizes by preaching and passing out literature on public sidewalks.  He also speaks and prays with people passing by.  (He appears to have an organization named Evangelism Mission.) Two years ago, he was proselytizing on the sidewalk near an intersection on the campus of the University of… Read More Court Upholds University of Alabama’s Permitting Scheme for On-Campus Speech

Unconstitutional for Oregon School District to Ban Picketing & Signs During Teachers’ Strike

Medford, Oregon, about 30 miles from the California border, was the site in May 2012 of a planned teachers’ strike that ended up lasting 9 days.  During the strike, some high school students even took to the streets as a show of support for their teachers. About a week before the strike—knowing that it was coming—the school… Read More Unconstitutional for Oregon School District to Ban Picketing & Signs During Teachers’ Strike